Sadler, Forrest

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Date
2003-04-03
Main contributors
Center for Public History, University of Houston; University of Houston Libraries, University of Houston
Summary
This is an oral history interview with Forrest Sadler conducted as part of the Houston History Project. Born in 1921, Forrest Sadler grew up in east Texas in the small town of Troup. His father worked in the oilfield firing boilers and would take Forrest to work with him when he was just a child. During high school, he worked summers in the oilfields. After he was discharged from the Navy in 1946, he went to work for Texaco in south Texas. Six years later, he went to work for a service company, Christianson Diamond Products Company, in Henderson, Texas. In 1958, he moved to Shreveport and was made district manager. Four years later he was transferred to Lafayette to get the district going. In 1969, he became sales coordinator for the Eastern Hemisphere and moved to London. After spending four years in that position, he was transferred to Singapore where he served as manager of Southeast Asia. He left Christianson in 1975, moved back to Lafayette, and then went to work as the Rocky Mountain manager for Hycalog in Casper, Wyoming, a year later, he was transferred to Singapore. Throughout the interview he remarks on how different the world is today than when he was growing up. Interviewer: Steven Wiltz, University of Louisiana at Lafayette.
Genre
interviews
Subjects
Energy development; Petroleum industry and trade; Sadler, Forrest
Location
Lafayette, Louisiana
Collection
Oral Histories from the Houston History Project
Unit
University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
Language
English
Rights Statement
In Copyright - Educational Use Permitted
Notes

Collection

University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
Houston History Archives
Oral Histories from the Houston History Project
Other Identifier
Preservation Location: ark:/84475/pm000000498
Resources
Finding Aid
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